creepysleepyqueer

drunkblogging:

jewist:

Guys this no-kill animal shelter in Illinois, USA is going to be shut down unless the raise $5,000 by August 1st which is in 3 days. They have raised $3,320 so far but are still not at their goal. PLEASE donate any amount of money to help keep this no-kill shelter alive. And please reblog this post to spread the word.

Here is a link to where you can donate:
http://www.youcaring.com/pet-expenses/newton-county-dogs/208762

PLEASE REBLOG THIS AND DONATE!!!

gracefulatfalling

stupiduglyfatcunt:

anastasiabeeverhousan:

marquesadesantos:

typette:

steveholtvstheuniverse:

cattomboy:

hecallsmepineappleprincess:

actuallybella:

i’ve seen more posts of people being excited for Home than this movie, which made me upset because this movie comes out before Home does (not that i am saying that you shouldn’t praise Home as well). and as for Big Hero 6 (a movie that also comes out after the Book of Life) and the people saying that there is a lack of representation of Asians in media, i feel you. why? because there is a bigger lack of hispanics, and i agree Disney messed up, you be upset. but be happy for Hispanics as well because we finally got an animated movie representing us and our culture. so please go see this movie when it comes out.

that is all i ask.

When I saw the trailer for this when I went to see the Lego movie it was so stunning I knew it was a movie I had to see

Also it looks like it;s by the same person who did El tirge 

which was a great and fun show 

ALSO!!! So far the trailers have be CHOCK FULL of allusions and references to different parts of Mexican culture and history!!

That beautiful lady up there is La Muerte and she’s straight up based off Catrinas which are popular figures and dolls used to represent Dia De Los Muertos.

NOT ONLY THAT but the weird texture on her skin is sugar! Why sugar? Sugar skulls! They’re a common treat found being sold by vendors and made by other families on Dia De Los Muertos.

BUT WOAH DON’T STOP THERE Along with having those two things play into her design she also has cempasúchil (marigold to put it simply) flowers in her hat. Why’s that important?  Those are called flor de los muertos, flower of the dead. They’re used to honor the dead and decorate the altars made by loved ones of the deceased.

And this is just ONE design. All of that thought, care, and attention to detail went into ONE design and that’s only scratching the surface. This isn’t even touching on the adelita twins NOR the town itself.

Like really, this is turning out to be a film crafted out of pure love and respect for the culture and the medium itself and, like OP, all I ask is that you PLEASE go check out this film when it’s released.

Because while you may verbally support it, the studio and the industry itself NEEDS to see money tied in with your voice and the voices of everyone else who has been supporting this film.

And hey! Danny Trejo and Ron Perlman are in it!

So yeah, GO WATCH THE BOOK OF LIFE.

dude I don’t know anybody who isn’t excited for this film.

The plot in this summary isn’t accurate! But that’s okay, that means there’s more reason to go see it!!

LA CATRINA IS SO BEAUTIFUL LOOK AT HER WHEN SHE APPEARS THERE’S ROSE PETAAALLLSSS

XIBALBA IS SO SCARY TOO I’M ALREADY AFRAID OMFG RON PERLMAN THO

you are all fools if you don’t go see this but I am sure all of you will

OMG LOOK LOOK A MOVIE ABOUT PEOPLE LIKE MEEEEEE

(now I just need one about Brazilians that doesn’t center around white people. Yes I’m talking about you, Rio)

If anyone cosplay’s this they’re going to get called a racist sooooo…

Soo? Does that somehow make the film less appealing or groundbreaking? Because white people can’t consume it as readily?

everminding
sourcedumal:

socimages:

Overweight Americans have the lowest risk of premature death.
By Lisa Wade, PhD
Last year the Journal of the American Medical Association released a study aiming to determine the relationship between body mass index and the risk of premature death. Body mass index, or BMI, is the ratio between your height and weight. According to the National Institutes of Health, you are “normal weight” if your ratio is between 18.5-24.9.  Everything over that is “overweight” or “obese” and everything under is “underweight.”
This study was a meta-analysis, which is an analysis of a collection of existing studies that systematically measures the sum of our knowledge.  In this case, the authors analyzed 97 studies that included a combined 2.88 million individuals and over 270,000 deaths.  They found that overweight individuals had a lower risk of premature death than so-called normal weight individuals and there was no relationship between being somewhat obese and the rate of early death. Only among people in the high range of obesity was there a correlation between their weight and a higher risk of premature death.
Here’s what it looked like.
Above is two columns of studies plotted according to the hazard ratio they reported for people.  This comparison is between people who are “overweight” (BMI = 25-29.9) and people who are “normal weight” (BMI = 18.5-24.9).  Studies that fall below the line marked 1.0 found a lower rate of premature death and studies above the line found a higher rate.
Just by eyeballing it, you can confirm that there is not a strong correlation between weight and premature death, at least in this population. When the scientists ran statistical analyses, the math showed that there is a statistically significant relationship between being “overweight” and a lower risk of death.
Here’s the same data, but comparing the risk of premature death among people who are “normal weight” (BMI = 18.5-24.9) and people who are somewhat “obese” (BMI = 30-34.9).  Again, eyeballing the results suggest that there’s not much correlation and, in fact, statistical analysis found none.

Finally, here are the results comparing “normal weight” (BMI = 18.5-24.9) and people who are quite “obese” (BMI = 35 or higher). In this case, we do see a relationship between risk of premature death in body weight.

It’s almost funny that the National Institutes of Health use the word normal when talking about BMI. It’s certainly not the norm – the average BMI in the U.S. falls slightly into the “overweight” category (26.6 for adult men and 25.5 for adult women) — and it’s not related to health. It’s clearly simply normative. It’s related to a socially constructed physical ideal that has little relationship to what physicians and public health advocates are supposed to be concerned with.  Normal is judgmental, but if they changed the word to healthy, they have to entirely rejigger their prescriptions.
So, do we even have an obesity epidemic? Perhaps not if we use health as a marker instead of some arbitrary decision to hate fat.  Paul Campos, covering this story for the New York Times, points out:

If the government were to redefine normal weight as one that doesn’t increase the risk of death, then about 130 million of the 165 million American adults currently categorized as overweight and obese would be re-categorized as normal weight instead.

That’s 79%.
It’s worth saying again: if we are measuring by the risk of premature death, then 79% of the people we currently shame for being overweight or obese would be recategorized as perfectly fine. Ideal, even. Pleased to be plump, let’s say, knowing that a body that is a happy balance of soft and strong is the kind of body that will carry them through a lifetime.
Lisa Wade is a professor of sociology at Occidental College and the co-author of Gender: Ideas, Interactions, Institutions. You can follow her on Twitter and Facebook.

But they ain’t trying to hear you tho. Better to hate on fat people. You’ll get more money for weight loss surgery that way

sourcedumal:

socimages:

Overweight Americans have the lowest risk of premature death.

By Lisa Wade, PhD

Last year the Journal of the American Medical Association released a study aiming to determine the relationship between body mass index and the risk of premature death. Body mass index, or BMI, is the ratio between your height and weight. According to the National Institutes of Health, you are “normal weight” if your ratio is between 18.5-24.9.  Everything over that is “overweight” or “obese” and everything under is “underweight.”

This study was a meta-analysis, which is an analysis of a collection of existing studies that systematically measures the sum of our knowledge.  In this case, the authors analyzed 97 studies that included a combined 2.88 million individuals and over 270,000 deaths.  They found that overweight individuals had a lower risk of premature death than so-called normal weight individuals and there was no relationship between being somewhat obese and the rate of early death. Only among people in the high range of obesity was there a correlation between their weight and a higher risk of premature death.

Here’s what it looked like.

Above is two columns of studies plotted according to the hazard ratio they reported for people.  This comparison is between people who are “overweight” (BMI = 25-29.9) and people who are “normal weight” (BMI = 18.5-24.9).  Studies that fall below the line marked 1.0 found a lower rate of premature death and studies above the line found a higher rate.

Just by eyeballing it, you can confirm that there is not a strong correlation between weight and premature death, at least in this population. When the scientists ran statistical analyses, the math showed that there is a statistically significant relationship between being “overweight” and a lower risk of death.

Here’s the same data, but comparing the risk of premature death among people who are “normal weight” (BMI = 18.5-24.9) and people who are somewhat “obese” (BMI = 30-34.9).  Again, eyeballing the results suggest that there’s not much correlation and, in fact, statistical analysis found none.

30-34.9

Finally, here are the results comparing “normal weight” (BMI = 18.5-24.9) and people who are quite “obese” (BMI = 35 or higher). In this case, we do see a relationship between risk of premature death in body weight.

35

It’s almost funny that the National Institutes of Health use the word normal when talking about BMI. It’s certainly not the norm – the average BMI in the U.S. falls slightly into the “overweight” category (26.6 for adult men and 25.5 for adult women) — and it’s not related to health. It’s clearly simply normative. It’s related to a socially constructed physical ideal that has little relationship to what physicians and public health advocates are supposed to be concerned with.  Normal is judgmental, but if they changed the word to healthy, they have to entirely rejigger their prescriptions.

So, do we even have an obesity epidemic? Perhaps not if we use health as a marker instead of some arbitrary decision to hate fat.  Paul Campos, covering this story for the New York Times, points out:

If the government were to redefine normal weight as one that doesn’t increase the risk of death, then about 130 million of the 165 million American adults currently categorized as overweight and obese would be re-categorized as normal weight instead.

That’s 79%.

It’s worth saying again: if we are measuring by the risk of premature death, then 79% of the people we currently shame for being overweight or obese would be recategorized as perfectly fine. Ideal, even. Pleased to be plump, let’s say, knowing that a body that is a happy balance of soft and strong is the kind of body that will carry them through a lifetime.

Lisa Wade is a professor of sociology at Occidental College and the co-author of Gender: Ideas, Interactions, Institutions. You can follow her on Twitter and Facebook.

But they ain’t trying to hear you tho. Better to hate on fat people. You’ll get more money for weight loss surgery that way

thisiseverydayracism

thisiseverydayracism:

il-tenore-regina:

indo-pak:

badass-bharat-deafmuslimpunkstar:

They want us to FORGET what they did to our peoples and lands, they want to keep us ignorant of what crimes they committed against our ancestors.

this is why we can’t trust you white people

White supremacy is the epitome of cowardice. 

Do they really think we don’t know just because they burned the documents?

Brits = the filthiest scum on earth.

bisexual-community
Dissecting a character to fit a heteronormative box is sloppy and irresponsible. Bisexuals deserve to be represented in media too — not erased or straight-washed. If NBC can’t handle portraying a bisexual male character, then perhaps the network shouldn’t take on John Constantine.

Sexuality is always a part of a character — however minimal — but some sort of romantic or sexual relationship is usually a significant plot point in superhero stories. A bisexual male superhero would disrupt the hetero male template of, “hero saves damsel in distress” that we see consistently in iconic stories like Superman, Spiderman, and Captain America. But it’s 2014, and sometimes men need saving too.

There’s something particularly elusive about bisexual male characters. There is a deeply ingrained misconception that a man can’t be romantically involved with another man and still be interested in women as well. It’s centered on the idea that masculinity requires a wanting, and “getting” of women, and not men. But the depiction of Constantine in Hellblazer proves that is a false assumption.

NBC’s Straight-Washing of John Constantine is Bi Erasure | Eliel Cruz for the Advocate Magazine (via gaywrites)

It’s bad enough networks don’t create bisexual characters let alone when they "straightwash" an existing one from (30 years!) canon. Make your voice heard!

  1. Sign the Petition then signal boost it to your friends on Tumblr, Facebook, Twitter, and anything else you can think of
  2. Tweet using the hashtag #BiBlazer (A combination of Bisexual and Hellblazer) to stop the bi erasure of a canon bisexual character. Direct your tweets to @JohnConWriters and @NBCConstantine.
(via bisexual-community)
creepysleepyqueer
artistica18:

throknar:

sophiaphilemon:

bracha-ncc1701:

sophiaphilemon:

bracha-ncc1701:

MY GIRLFRIEND IS FUCKING INSANE

No it would be instantaneous and then your body would float around those big colorful nebulas and you could get to other galaxies and maybe become part of a moon or get incinerated in a star or fall into a black hole.
You could become part of an asteroid and impact on a moon and your microscopic dust remains are scattered all over the crater.
You could become part of a star and undergo nuclear fission and turn into hydrogen and your body is a tiny fraction of the process of the star and you make light for the universe and then the star ages and your atoms get turned into iron and then the star goes supernova and you’re spewed across the universe as space dust.
You could land of a kind-of habitable planet and your DNA survives as you start to decompose and in a few million years the primitive life forms of your body become science’s greatest mystery for humankind.
You could be found by an alien civilization who’s also wondering ‘are we alone in the universe’ and suddenly they know they’re not because woah processed materials and tools and crazy-developed processing centers woah and then in a couple thousand years they make first contact because of the space-travelling cultural revolution your corpse prompted in their society and the humans of the future go ‘how did you get all these spaceships and junk’ and they reverently pull out your body and you are interred with great fanfare and people make you statues and holidays and stuff.
Your body could end up literally anywhere in the universe and you’d be the first human there because who said you had to be alive huh?
SPACE

What is wrong with you

ABSOLUTELY NOTHING

No. This is wrong. Death is far from instantaneous.
Your body volume starts to rapidly expand after about 10 seconds. Your circulatory system fails, and you become paralyzed, in about 30 seconds. Around the same time, your lungs also collapse and then your respiratory tract ices over. A person generally loses consciousness in under 15 seconds, but they continue clinging to life for quite some time. Victims exposed to the vacuum of space, for less than 90 seconds, can almost always recover and, in tests, chimpanzees were able to survive a 3.5 minute exposure time. If these numbers apply to humans, it could take a person nearly 5 minutes, in a vacuum, to actually die.
Also, it will probably be the most painful, and horrifying, moments of your life.
Source.Source.

Well fuck.

Still, the rest of that sounds pretty cool …

artistica18:

throknar:

sophiaphilemon:

bracha-ncc1701:

sophiaphilemon:

bracha-ncc1701:

MY GIRLFRIEND IS FUCKING INSANE

No it would be instantaneous and then your body would float around those big colorful nebulas and you could get to other galaxies and maybe become part of a moon or get incinerated in a star or fall into a black hole.

You could become part of an asteroid and impact on a moon and your microscopic dust remains are scattered all over the crater.

You could become part of a star and undergo nuclear fission and turn into hydrogen and your body is a tiny fraction of the process of the star and you make light for the universe and then the star ages and your atoms get turned into iron and then the star goes supernova and you’re spewed across the universe as space dust.

You could land of a kind-of habitable planet and your DNA survives as you start to decompose and in a few million years the primitive life forms of your body become science’s greatest mystery for humankind.

You could be found by an alien civilization who’s also wondering ‘are we alone in the universe’ and suddenly they know they’re not because woah processed materials and tools and crazy-developed processing centers woah and then in a couple thousand years they make first contact because of the space-travelling cultural revolution your corpse prompted in their society and the humans of the future go ‘how did you get all these spaceships and junk’ and they reverently pull out your body and you are interred with great fanfare and people make you statues and holidays and stuff.

Your body could end up literally anywhere in the universe and you’d be the first human there because who said you had to be alive huh?

SPACE

What is wrong with you

ABSOLUTELY NOTHING

No. This is wrong. Death is far from instantaneous.

Your body volume starts to rapidly expand after about 10 seconds. Your circulatory system fails, and you become paralyzed, in about 30 seconds. Around the same time, your lungs also collapse and then your respiratory tract ices over. A person generally loses consciousness in under 15 seconds, but they continue clinging to life for quite some time. Victims exposed to the vacuum of space, for less than 90 seconds, can almost always recover and, in tests, chimpanzees were able to survive a 3.5 minute exposure time. If these numbers apply to humans, it could take a person nearly 5 minutes, in a vacuum, to actually die.

Also, it will probably be the most painful, and horrifying, moments of your life.

Source.
Source.

Well fuck.

Still, the rest of that sounds pretty cool …